Wofford Arboretum Central Campus

Sinopsis

Take Wofford's Arboretum tour with you on your iPod as you walk around Wofford's beautiful campus.

Episodios

  • 55.Chestnut Oak

    55.Chestnut Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 47s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 60 – 70 Spread: Irregular Habit: Round and relatively dense Light: Best in full sun Soil: Normally found in poor, dry, rocky soil, maximum growth occurs in well-drained, moist soil Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1 – 1 1/4 long by 3/4 wide, rich brown color Landscape use: Good medium-size tree for use as a specimen tree, in parks and public places History: Native range is from southern Maine and Ontario to South Carolina and Alabama; cultivated in 1688 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Dark brown to black bark; sweet acorn provides food for wildlife

  • 54.Shumard Oak

    54.Shumard Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 46s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 9 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 40 – 60 Habit: In youth: pyramidal; At maturity: more spreading Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained soil preferable Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: ovate acorn 3/4 – 1 long Landscape use: Magnificent shade tree, great for streets, golf courses, and campuses; not suitable for small area History: Native range is Kansas to southern Michigan to North Carolina, Florida and Texas; introduced in 1907 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Drought tolerant; good russet-red to red fall color

  • 52.Aurora® Dogwood

    52.Aurora® Dogwood

    28/06/2007 Duración: 01min

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 8 Height: 20 – 30 Spread: equals height Habit: Vigorous, erect and wide-spreading throughout Light: Best in sun or partial shade Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile soil preferable Flowers: true flowers are inconspicuous, surrounded by large pointed bracts 1 1/2 – 2 long; floral bracts are white and have a velvety texture Fruit: none Landscape use: Useful as specimen tree or accent in background; excellent border or hedge for large areas; attractive against large evergreens History: One clone in a series of hybrids developed by Elwin Orton at Rutgers University. The hybrids resulted from crosses between C. kousa, C. florida, and C. nuttallii Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Very floriferous; develops exfoliating bark charactersitics with age; leaves are dark green

  • 53.Southern Red Oak

    53.Southern Red Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 43s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 70 – 80 Spread: 3/4 height Habit: Rounded outline at maturity Light: Best in full sun Soil: Characteristic soil is dry and poor, but develops best on loamy ridges Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1/2 long Landscape use: Nice shade tree for use in large areas; similar uses to white oak History: Native range is Virginia to Florida, west to southern Illinois and Arkansas; introduced in 1763 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Leaves are dark green above and yellowish-brown beneath

  • 51.Swamp Chestnut Oak

    51.Swamp Chestnut Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 49s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: larger than 60 – 70 Spread: Irregular Habit: Round and relatively dense Light: Best in full sun Soil: Moister soils than chestnut oak Flowers: insignificant hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1 – 1 1/4 long by 3/4 wide, rich brown color Landscape use: Good medium size tree for use as a specimen tree, in parks and public places History: Native range is from southern Maine and Ontario to South Carolina and Alabama; cultivated in 1688 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Bark is scaly, similar to white oak, whereas chestnut oak is deeply grooved; pubescent on underside of leaves and branchlets

  • 50.Winged Elm

    50.Winged Elm

    28/06/2007 Duración: 45s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 60 – 70 Spread: close to 1/2 its height Habit: Spreading branches forming a round-topped oblong head Light: Sun or partial shade Soil: Rich, moist soil preferable Flowers: greenish-red, open in mid to late February Fruit: winged fruit Landscape use: Good lawn and street shade tree History: Native range is Virginia to Florida, west to Illinois, Oklahoma, and Texas; introduced in 1820 Pests\Problems: Pests: bark aphid, wood borer, beech scale; Problems: powdery mildew (leaves appear white) Significant Features: Corky, winged bark on branches

  • 49.Bur Oak

    49.Bur Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 01min

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 2 – 8 Height: 70 – 80 with a maximum of 100 Spread: equal or greater than height Habit: In youth: weakly pyramidal to oval; At maturity: massive trunk and broad crown with stout branches Light: Best in full sun Soil: Very adaptable to various soils Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 3/4 – 1 1/2 long Landscape use: Too large for home landscapes; excellent for parks or large areas History: Native range is Nova Scotia to Pennsylvania, west to Manitoba and Texas; introduced in 1811 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: various types of galls; roots may crack driveway or patio surfaces if planted too close; powdery mildew; canker; anthracnose Significant Features: Fringed acorn cup, exceptional size; some display corky ridges on small branches

  • 48.Scarlet Oak

    48.Scarlet Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 51s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 9 Height: 70 – 75 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 40 – 50 Habit: Symmetrical with rounded crown; branches gradually spreading and curving upward Light: Full sun or partial shade Soil: Generally found on dry, sandy soils; well-drained, medium fertile; slightly moist soil preferable Flowers: hanging catkins Fruit: ovoid acorn 3/4 long enclosed in a deep, bowl-like cup Landscape use: Excellent for framing, background, shade, and street plantings History: Native range is Maine to Florida, west to Minnesota and Missouri; introduced in 1691 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Excellent foliage; pleasing fall color; rapid growth

  • 47.Water Oak

    47.Water Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 01min

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 3 – 9 Height: 60 – 100 Spread: 50 – 80 Habit: Upright-rounded to broad-rounded with wide-spreading branches at maturity Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Best in deep, moist, well-drained soils, acidic soil preferable Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1/2 long and wide Landscape use: Majestic specimen tree, splendid for permanent planting in spacious areas; among the most handsome of oaks History: Native range is Maine to Florida, west to Minnesota and Texas; introduced in 1724 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: various types of galls; roots may crack driveway or patio surfaces if planted too close; powdery mildew; canker; anthracnose Significant Features: Massive spreading branches that twist with age; variable ashy gray bark often arranged in vertical blocks

  • 46.Katsuratree

    46.Katsuratree

    28/06/2007 Duración: 53s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 20 – 30 Habit: In youth: pyramidal, full and dense; At maturity: greatly variable Light: Full sun Soil: Rich, moist soil, well-drained preferable Flowers: not showy; open before the leaves Fruit: small, 1/2 – 3/4 long pods, 2 – 4 together on a short stalk Landscape use: Excellent for residential properties, parks, golf courses, commercial areas History: Native range is China and Japan; introduced in 1865 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: inconsequential sun scald and bark splitting Significant Features: Yellow to magnificent apricot fall color; heart-shaped leaves

  • 45.Tulip Poplar

    45.Tulip Poplar

    28/06/2007 Duración: 57s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 9 Height: 70 – 90 with a maximum of 150 Spread: 35 – 50 Habit: Somewhat pyramidal in youth; maturing to oval-rounded Light: Full sun or partial shade Soil: Deep, moist, well-drained loam with slight acidity Flowers: greenish-yellow and tulip-like; May to early June Fruit: May to early June Landscape use: Not suitable for small or residential use, should be restricted to large areas, very large and magnificent tree when fully grown, good for group plantings History: Native range is Massachusetts to Wisconsin, south to Florida and Mississippi, cultivated in 1663 Pests\Problems: Great fall colors; can be spectacularly yellow; valued for flowers and foliage Significant Features: Great fall colors; can be spectacularly yellow; valued for flowers and foliage

  • 44.Post Oak

    44.Post Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 41s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 9 Height: 40 – 50 Spread: 1/2 – 3/4 height Habit: Dense, round-topped crown with stout, spreading branches Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Silty, loamy soils preferable Flowers: inconspicuous hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 3/4 – 1 long, egg-shaped Landscape use: Seldom used in landscape situations History: Native range is southern Massachusetts to Florida, west to Iowa and Texas; introduced in 1819 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Thick, shiny, dark green leaves

  • 43.‘Princeton’ American Elm

    43.‘Princeton’ American Elm

    28/06/2007 Duración: 01min

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 2 – 9 Height: 60 – 80 with maximum of 100 – 120 Spread: 1/2 – 2/3 its height Habit: Irregular, widely arching branches forming vase shape; angles of branches acute Light: Sun or partial shade Soil: Rich, moist soil preferable but grows well under a variety of conditions Flowers: greenish-red in fascicles; inconspicuous Fruit: rounded, notched, disc-shaped, winged fruit Landscape use: American elm formerly widely planted on boulevards and parkways History: Native range is Newfoundland to Florida, west to the foot of the Rockies; introduced in 1752 Pests\Problems: Pests: bark aphid, wood borer, beech scale; Problems: Dutch Elm disease now limits landscape use; mildew Significant Features: Large, leathery foliage; vigorous and supposedly resistant to elm leaf beetle

  • 42.Nuttall Oak

    42.Nuttall Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 01min

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 80 – 100 Spread: 50 – 80 Habit: In youth: pyramidal, narrow crown; At maturity: open crown with spreading branches Light: Best in full sun Soil: Moist, well-drained soil preferable, can withstand great variability in pH Flowers: yellow-green hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 3/4 – 1 1/4 oblong acorn, usually dark-striped Landscape use: Used for lawns, parks, golf courses, commercial landscapes, and streets History: Native range is Alabama westward to eastern Texas, northward to southeastern Oklahoma, Arkansas, southeastern Missouri, and western Tennessee; distinguished as a species in 1927 Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Can not tolerate shade, grows well in areas of low oxygen availability, distinguished from pin oak by size of acorn

  • 41.Chinese Pistache

    41.Chinese Pistache

    28/06/2007 Duración: 43s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 30 – 35 Spread: 25 – 35 Habit: Oval-rounded in outline with upswept branches Light: Best in full sun Soil: Moist, well-drained soil preferable Flowers: occur on previous years wood, not showy Fruit: obovoid 1/4 diameter drupe similar to crab apple, maturing to sky blue color in October Landscape use: Great for lawn, park, and street use History: Native range is central and western China; introduced in 1890 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Extremely drought tolerant; good habit and excellent fall color

  • 40.‘Fairmont’ Ginkgo

    40.‘Fairmont’ Ginkgo

    28/06/2007 Duración: 52s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 3 – 8 Height: 70 – 80 Spread: 30 – 40 Habit: Narrow, upright, pyramidal form Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Sandy, deep, moderately moist soil preferable but grows in almost any situation; very pH adaptable Flowers: anthers in 1 long, green catkins Fruit: plum-like in shape, tan to orangish in color, seeds are foul smelling and only on female plants Landscape use: Excellent city tree or specimen for large areas History: Native range is eastern China; introduced in 1784 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Exceptional vitality and handsome foliage; unique winter habit; magnificent yellow fall color, tolerant to air pollution

  • 39.Southern Magnolia

    39.Southern Magnolia

    28/06/2007 Duración: 55s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 7 – 9 Height: 60 – 80 Spread: 30 – 50 Habit: Densely pyramidal, low branching, stately, evergreen tree; some trees become as wide as tall Light: Best in sun or partial shade Soil: Rich, porous, acidic and well-drained soil Flowers: creamy white, wonderfully fragrant, 8 – 12” in diameter, flowering period is from May to June Fruit: cone-like with exposed red seeds Landscape use: Needs ample space to develop; use as screen, grouping, and hedge; characteristic of southern gardening heritage History: Native range is North Carolina to Florida and Texas; cultivated in 1734 Pests\Problems: Essentially problem-free Significant Features: Low-lying branches, flower size and fragrance

  • 38.‘Yarwood’ London Planetree

    38.‘Yarwood’ London Planetree

    28/06/2007 Duración: 01min

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 70 – 100 with a maximum of 120 Spread: 65 – 80 Habit: In youth: pyramidal; At maturity: open, wide spreading, with massive branches Light: Best in full sun or very light shade Soil: Deep, rich, moist, well-drained soil preferable but will grow in almost any soil Flowers: inconspicuous Fruit: globular headed, 1 1/2 in diameter, 2, 3 or 6 together Landscape use: Acceptable for open areas, parks, golf courses, campuses, streets History: First record of tree was in 1663 when hybrid was growing in London; dominant street tree in London Pests\Problems: Pests: borers, lacebug; Problems: canker, powdery mildew, frost cracking, anthracnose Significant Features: Very long lived; withstands worst city conditions; requires occasional cleanup of leaves, fruit and bark; easily transplanted

  • 37.‘Fastigiate’ Atlas Cedar

    37.‘Fastigiate’ Atlas Cedar

    28/06/2007 Duración: 58s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 120 Spread: 30 – 40 with a maximum of 90 – 100 Habit: Upright form with blue-green needles Light: Sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained, deep, loamy soil preferable but will tolerate sandy or clay soil Flowers: 2 – 3 long male cones; erect female cones in upper part of tree Fruit: 2 1/4 – 4 long, glaucous green cones Landscape use: Good specimen tree, especially when fully mature; allow ample room for development History: Native range is Algeria and Morocco on the Atlas Mountains; introduced before 1840 Pests\Problems: Pests: black scale and deodar weevil; Problems: tip blight and root rot Significant Features: Bluish-green color, not as magnificent as the species

  • 36.Willow Oak

    36.Willow Oak

    28/06/2007 Duración: 54s

    Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 9 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 90 – 100 Spread: 30 – 40 Habit: In youth: pyramidal; At maturity: dense oblong-oval to rounded crown at maturity Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained acidic soil preferable, can adapt to very difficult habitats Flowers: inconspicuous Fruit: acorn with alternating brown and black bands Landscape use: Best oak for overall texture and form; splendid for avenue use and large area use such as commercial establishments, golf courses and parks History: Native range is New York to Florida, west to Missouri and Texas; introduced in 1723 Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Finer textured leaves than most oaks; relatively fast growing

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