The Economist Radio (All audio)

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Sinopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodios

  • Editor’s Picks: December 13th 2021

    13/12/2021 Duración: 23min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what would America fight for? Also, why two years after a famous election victory, Boris Johnson’s would-be radical administration has run into the ground (09:20). And we explore how Beijing’s Winter Olympics may hasten China’s break with the West (17:10). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Taiwan wonder

    10/12/2021 Duración: 39min

    Taiwan is arguably America’s defining foreign-policy challenge. The calibrated ambiguity over whether the US would defend the island democracy from a Chinese attack is hard to sustain as China’s power grows. Would the US go to war over Taiwan?The Economist's Beijing bureau chief David Rennie assesses the likelihood of a Chinese attack on Taiwan. We look back at the origins of America’s ambiguous Taiwan policy. And Anton La Guardia, our diplomatic editor, spots Washington doves. The Economist's US editor John Prideaux hosts with Jon Fasman, US digital editor and New York Bureau Chief Charlotte Howard. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unsafe as houses? Evergrande and China’s big plans

    10/12/2021 Duración: 24min

    The wildly indebted property firm has defaulted at last. That poses big risks as China’s leadership works to refashion financial markets and draw in foreign investors. We visit the world’s largest lithium reserves, asking why Bolivia has not yet made the most of them—and whether it still might. And the Chopin concert aimed at calming Poland’s refugee tensions.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Richard Moore

    09/12/2021 Duración: 32min

    In a rare interview, the head of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service spells out his plans to modernise MI6. He tells Anne McElvoy and Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, why China is his most pressing priority. The spymaster wants to recruit diverse talent, but how is he encouraging ethnic minorities to join the ranks? And what does “C” make of his big-screen counterpart “M” in the James Bond films?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Ain’t no party: scandals hobble Britain’s government

    09/12/2021 Duración: 22min

    At two years into Boris Johnson’s premiership, yet more scandal ensures attention will still stray from the sweeping agenda of change he promised. An archaeological find in the state of Tamil Nadu rewrites the timeline of civilisation in India—raising questions of identity in a charged political atmosphere. And the man listening intently to the staggering variety of Beijing’s birds.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: The not-so-great resignation

    08/12/2021 Duración: 28min

    The idea that the pandemic has prompted people to quit their jobs en masse fills corporate earnings calls, headlines and social media. But do the data hold up? Host Patrick Lane investigates what is really going on in the labour market. Will the Biden administration usher in a new age for America’s formidable unions? And we visit a would-be paradise for digital nomads. We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/moneytalkssurvey Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • CDU later: Angela Merkel’s successor

    08/12/2021 Duración: 22min

    For the first time in 16 years Mrs Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union is out of Germany’s government. We ask what to expect from Olaf Scholz, the new chancellor. China’s leadership wants to boost the birth rate but discriminates against single mothers; we examine a slow push for equality. And mental-health apps are booming, but the risks are many and the benefits uncertain. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here. www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Goodbye darkness, my old friend

    07/12/2021 Duración: 29min

    Thousands of satellites are being propelled into low-Earth orbit to provide internet access. Host Alok Jha investigates the impact on astronomy, as companies such as SpaceX multiply their constellations. What can be done to protect the night sky? We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/babbagesurvey.  For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Off the warpath: America 80 years after Pearl Harbour

    07/12/2021 Duración: 22min

    The Japanese attack set America on a course toward military hegemony; recent administrations have walked it back. We ask what the country would fight for now. A clash of priorities between national and city-level politicians the world over makes for fraught politics on car ownership. And our columnist envisages how the office will compete with home in a post-pandemic world.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World Ahead: Year three

    06/12/2021 Duración: 26min

    In wealthy and well-vaccinated countries, year three of the pandemic will be better than year two. But in countries that are poorer, less well vaccinated or both, the deleterious effects of the virus will linger. A disparity of outcomes between rich and poor countries will emerge. Meanwhile, tests and treatments for “long covid” are on the horizon and the mRNA technology used in some covid vaccines could be applied to other diseases. So could there be a “covid dividend”?Host Tom Standage talks to The Economist's Edward Carr, Natasha Loder and Slavea Chankova.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer.And we would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/worldaheadsurvey.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The first sentence of the story: Aung San Suu Kyi

    06/12/2021 Duración: 22min

    Myanmar’s ousted leader has been sentenced to four years in prison; more guilty verdicts are expected soon. That will only fuel unrest that has not ceased since a coup in February. Scrutiny of Interpol’s new president adds to concerns that the supranational agency is in authoritarians’ pockets. And governments start to back the “seasteading” of libertarians’ dreams.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: December 6th 2021

    06/12/2021 Duración: 23min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what the Omicron variant means for the world economy, what experiments with “free banking” in the 18th and 19th centuries reveal about the future of stablecoins (10:53) and how the legacy of Stalin’s gulag continues to shape Russian fortunes (18:16)  Please fill in our listener survey at www.economist.com/epsurvey  Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Courting controversy

    03/12/2021 Duración: 42min

    The Supreme Court looks poised to place dramatic limits on abortion rights. Liberals worry this signals a conservative takeover of the nation’s laws, but the justices deny that they are politicians in robes. How is the Supreme Court reshaping America?The Economist’s Steve Mazie explains what another case on the docket reveals about the court’s conservative wing. We go back to a surprising ruling on gay rights. And former Trump official Sarah Isgur tells us what the right thinks of the court.Jon Fasman presents with Charlotte Howard. We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/USpodsurvey For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Taiwan thing after another: the Solomon Islands

    03/12/2021 Duración: 20min

    The archipelago’s diplomatic pivot to China has added an international dimension to the latest flare-up of domestic tensions. We ask how this tiny state figures into far larger geopolitics. British law permits medical cannabis for children with epilepsy—so why are so few able to get it? And a Formula 1 race may mark the end of Saudi Arabia’s alcohol ban.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Eric Cantor

    02/12/2021 Duración: 27min

    The former House majority leader and Virginia congressman assesses whether the Republican Party needs Donald Trump to win. The one-time rising star of the GOP talks to Anne McElvoy about the lessons learnt from losing his seat to a Tea-Party challenger. Is bipartisanship broken or can his old frenemy President Joe Biden fix it? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Roe blow? SCOTUS weighs abortion rights

    02/12/2021 Duración: 24min

    The conservative supermajority on America’s Supreme Court looks likely to strip back rights enshrined since the Roe v Wade ruling in 1973. Beset by natural disasters, Puerto Rico did not seem ready for a pandemic—but our correspondent finds it has done better than the rest of America. And an intriguing new idea in the mystery of how Earth got its water. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Omicronomics

    01/12/2021 Duración: 31min

    China’s economy is slowing while America’s overheats, prompting Jerome Powell to suggest this week that the Fed could act faster than planned. As the Omicron variant triggers a fresh wave of travel restrictions, is the world economy caught between a rock and a hard place? Host Patrick Lane and Henry Curr, our economics editor, assess the threats to global growth.With Carmen Reinhart, senior vice-president and chief economist of the World Bank group, and Wang Tao, chief China economist and head of Asia research for UBS, an investment bank.We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/moneytalkssurvey Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The house that Jack built: Twitter’s founder departs

    01/12/2021 Duración: 19min

    Jack Dorsey’s departure from the social-media giant reflects the growing primacy of engineering talent, and the waning mythology of the big-tech founder. Ukraine’s military has become much better at battling Russian-backed separatists since the annexation of Crimea—but now a far graver kind of war looms. And the Economist Intelligence Unit’s latest list of the world’s most expensive cities.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Omicron and on

    30/11/2021 Duración: 28min

    Countries are scrambling to stop the Omicron variant of the coronavirus. We search for scientific clues to understand how it will shape the pandemic. Professor Sharon Peacock, one of the world’s top variant hunters, predicts Omicron will be more transmissible than previous strains. And, will Omicron supplant the Delta variant globally? Correspondent Hal Hodson looks to immunology for answers.Alok Jha hosts, with The Economist’s health policy editor, Natasha Loder and deputy editor, Edward Carr.We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/babbagesurvey.  To keep up-to-date with our coverage of the Omicron variant, go to economist.com/omicron.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Centrifugal forces: Iran nuclear talks resume

    30/11/2021 Duración: 22min

    Things were all smiles after negotiations resumed—but it is difficult to see how a middle ground can be reached in Iran’s nuclear ambitions. Apple’s surprise move to permit repairs to its hardware reflects the growing “right to repair” movement, and a shift in the notion of tech ownership. And the “grab lists” that museum curators prefer not to talk about. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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