The Economist Radio (All audio)

Informações:

Sinopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodios

  • The Floyd factor: American police reform

    02/11/2021 Duración: 21min

    More than a year after George Floyd was murdered by a Minneapolis policeman, the city votes on an overhaul of its force. We examine America’s shifting debate over police reform. Cryptocurrencies have taken off in Cuba; but the communist authorities want control. And light may be shed on the mystery of the reproductive habits—and extraordinary migration—of eels. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • To a Lesser Degree: COP26 kicks off

    01/11/2021 Duración: 36min

    As the COP26 climate conference begins in Glasgow, much is at stake. Will the leaders gathered there be able to reach an agreement to slow global warming?US climate envoy John Kerry tells us why he is optimistic. We report from Australia, one of the rich countries lagging in its climate commitments, to look at the politics behind the negotiations.Hosted by Vijay Vaitheeswaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, with environment editor Catherine Brahic, and Oliver Morton, our briefings editor. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/climatepod and you can sign up to our fortnightly climate newsletter at economist.com/theclimateissue.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cool heads needed: COP26 begins

    01/11/2021 Duración: 20min

    World leaders are gathering in Glasgow for the UN climate summit. Can they agree on the path to meeting the goals set in Paris six years ago, to stabilise global temperatures? We weigh up the chances. Sex work is illegal almost everywhere in America; a growing movement wants that to change. And why Britain’s TV-production industry is booming.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: November 1st 2021

    01/11/2021 Duración: 24min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week why the COP26 climate summit will be both disappointing—and crucial; the autumn of a patriarch in Turkey (11:23); and our Banyan columnist on the BJP’s battle with Bollywood (18:47)  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Left behind

    29/10/2021 Duración: 41min

    The race to be Virginia’s next governor should be an easy win for the Democratic Party, so how did it get this tight? Democrats in Washington are struggling to pass a budget bill and fighting among themselves, the president’s approval ratings are in the doldrums and demographic trends are setting the party up for long-term weakness. Is this as good as it gets for the Democrats?  Jon Fasman reports from an election rally in Virginia. We go back to a time when civil rights tore the party apart. And The Economist’s Elliot Morris explains why the future looks grim for Democrats at the polls.  John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Going critical: Iran’s nuclear programme

    29/10/2021 Duración: 23min

    The Islamic Republic is closer than ever to a bomb’s worth of fissile material. Talks with America and other countries will resume next month, but hopes of an agreement are fading. Is war inevitable? Chinese media are not allowed to report on the #MeToo movement, but the Communist Party is taking up some feminist causes. We consider the paradox of women’s rights in modern China. And we look back at the life of Anne Saxelby, a pioneering American cheesemonger, who has died aged 40.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Indra Nooyi

    28/10/2021 Duración: 32min

    Is work-life balance possible at the top? Host Anne McElvoy asks the former chief executive of PepsiCo how she juggled family commitments with leading a Fortune 500 company. She shares her lessons on mixing business with politics – and how should top companies respond to criticism that they pay too little tax? And why did she plump for a corporate career when she could have been a rock star?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Competitive spirit: tech after the pandemic

    28/10/2021 Duración: 21min

    After a year of breakneck growth, the big five tech companies—Alphabet, Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft—are coming back down to earth. We look at how the pandemic has changed the industry and spurred on smaller firms. Serbia’s military build-up is making its neighbours nervous. The country’s president tells us why he’s been amassing arms. And evolution usually unfolds over millions of years. But new research into Mozambique’s tuskless elephants suggests that it can be turbocharged by humans. Additional audio used with permission from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Is the future non-fungible?

    27/10/2021 Duración: 29min

    This week The Economist auctioned off an Alice in Wonderland-inspired NFT for charity. Host Rachana Shanbhogue finds out how the sale went and explores the promise and pitfalls of this dizzying new market. Plus, the financial landscape in Africa is changing fast: we ask why the unicorn population has more than doubled this year and speak to Sim Tshabalala, head of the continent’s largest lender, Standard Group Bank. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Winter is coming: Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis

    27/10/2021 Duración: 20min

    Two months after the Taliban’s victory, civilians face a looming disaster. Will Western governments dig their heels in, or turn the aid taps back on? India’s government has increasingly turned to high-tech means for delivering government services. But its digital-first solutions are inaccessible to millions of citizens. And we look at the business of renting clothing, as Rent the Runway goes public with a sky-high valuation.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Cleaning the air

    26/10/2021 Duración: 28min

    The World Health Organisation recently declared that air pollution is the greatest environmental threat to health globally. What do cities and governments need to do to clean up their act? Also, we explore how Occam’s razor, ​​a theory from a medieval theologist, has influenced science. And, could music be an effective way to communicate with extraterrestrials? Alok Jha hosts For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.Terms and conditions for the book competition featured in this podcast are available at economist.com/podcast-contest.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trouble in Khartoum: Sudan’s coup

    26/10/2021 Duración: 22min

    Just as the country was moving towards democracy, its generals have overthrown the civilians—again. We look at what sparked the unrest, and why coups in Africa are on the rise. Ecuador declared a state of emergency last week over a wave of violent crime. It’s just one of several headaches for Guillermo Lasso, the country’s president. And we explain why you have an accent in a foreign language.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • To a Lesser Degree: Living in a hotter world

    25/10/2021 Duración: 34min

    Actions to combat climate change have been primarily focused on mitigation - limiting the amount of greenhouse-gas emissions in the atmosphere. But even with those efforts, the planet's temperature will continue to rise, leading to more extreme weather events. How will humanity adapt?Bill Gates, the co-founder of Microsoft, tells us why adaptation in agriculture is critical to feeding the world. We go to China to explore a new kind of “sponge city,” which is designed to absorb water. And we examine the peril and promise of solar geoengineering. Hosted by Vijay Vaitheeswaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, with environment editor Catherine Brahic, and Oliver Morton, our briefings editor. For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/climatepod and you can sign up to our fortnightly climate newsletter at economist.com/theclimateissue.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-o

  • You shall not pass: standardising vaccine passports

    25/10/2021 Duración: 20min

    Covid certificates are a global mess, with countries operating a patchwork of incompatible systems. We look at why it’s so difficult to standardise digital health passes. When the results of Uzbekistan’s elections are published today, the only surprise will be the margin of victory for Shavkat Mirziyoyev, the country’s autocratic leader since 2016. The question is how far he can take his agenda of economic and political reform. And Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs), a way of representing ownership of digital media, have taken the art world by storm. Why The Economist is getting in the game. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: October 25th 2021

    24/10/2021 Duración: 22min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the real-time revolution transforming economics, how insurgency, secessionism and banditry threaten Nigeria (10:06) and our Bartleby columnist on why corporate mission statements deserve more than an eye-roll (17:39)   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Labour’s love lost

    22/10/2021 Duración: 39min

    Wages are going up and employees are walking out - some to strike, some never to come back. American workers have more leverage than before the pandemic. How permanent is this shift in power?The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch takes us to a picket line in Pennsylvania and we go back to an earlier walk out in Hollywood. Betsey Stevenson, one of President Obama’s economics advisors, tells us how long this could last. John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Flu into a rage: Brazil’s Bolsonaro inquiry

    22/10/2021 Duración: 21min

    President Jair Bolsonaro’s early dismissal of the pandemic as “a little flu” presaged a calamitous handling of the crisis. We ask how a congressional investigation’s dramatic assessment of his non-actions may damage him. China’s test of a hypersonic, nuclear-capable glider may rattle the global weapons order. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of level-headed American statesman Colin Powell.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Nobel peace prize winners 2021

    21/10/2021 Duración: 26min

    This year’s award celebrates two journalists working in countries where the screws are tightening on media freedom. Host Anne McElvoy asks Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Russia’s Dmitry Muratov how they are defending the free press. The editor of Novaya Gazeta explains why he has dedicated his medal to murdered colleagues and the co-founder of Rappler shares how she fights back in the face of online trolling. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • States of emergency: Nigeria

    21/10/2021 Duración: 23min

    Criminal gangs in north-western states, jihadists in the north-east, a rebellion in the south-east: kidnappers, warlords and cattle rustlers are making the country ungovernable. The new head of Samsung Electronics has a legacy to build—and aims to do so by breaking into the cut-throat business of processor chips. And the sci-fi classic “Dune” gets a good cinematic treatment at last.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: In a tightening spot

    20/10/2021 Duración: 29min

    Higher inflation looks likely to last into 2022. The Bank of England could be the first big central bank to raise interest rates—why might it make the first move? Also, our team explores how real-time data are upending economics. And Michael Dell, boss of the eponymous tech firm, on why founders are leaving Silicon Valley for Texas and why PCs are still sexy. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

página 3 de 125