The Economist Radio (All audio)

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Sinopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodios

  • Clubs seal: China’s view as alliances multiply

    24/09/2021 Duración: 23min

    Leaders of “the Quad” are meeting in person for the first time; drama from the AUKUS alliance still simmers. Our Beijing bureau chief discusses how Chinese officials see all these club ties. As Chancellor Angela Merkel’s time in office wanes, we assess Germany’s many challenges she leaves behind. And the sweet, sweet history of baklava, a Middle Eastern treat gone global.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: What happens after Merkel?

    23/09/2021 Duración: 26min

    Host Anne McElvoy reviews the German Chancellor’s 16-year leadership with Wolfgang Nowak, a political veteran who advised Angela Merkel's predecessor, and asks what made her such a phenomenal politician. And as the race to replace Angela Merkel draws to a close, Anne talks to security expert Claudia Major about the domestic and foreign challenges awaiting her successor. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Same assembly, rewired: the United Nations meets

    23/09/2021 Duración: 22min

    The annual United Nations General Assembly is more than just worthy pledges and fancy dinners; we ask where the tensions and the opportunities lie this time around. Last year’s fears of a crippling “twindemic” of covid-19 and influenza proved unfounded—and that provides more reason to worry this year. And why “like” is, like, really useful. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Volatile gas

    22/09/2021 Duración: 27min

    The price of natural gas is rocketing, with global consequences. Is volatility in this crucial fuel here to stay? We also ask why an investigation at the World Bank has put Kristalina Georgieva, the head of the International Monetary Fund, in the spotlight. And, after our adventures in DeFi-land last week, economist Eswar Prasad assesses who should control the future of money and payments. Patrick Lane hostsSign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The homes stretch: Evergrande

    22/09/2021 Duración: 19min

    China’s property behemoth has slammed up against new rules on its giant debt pile. We ask what wider risks it now poses as a cash crunch bites. Britain has begun a demographic trend unusual in the rich world: its share of young people is spiking—and will be for a decade. And what the pandemic has done for the future of office-wear.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: From pandemic to twindemic

    21/09/2021 Duración: 28min

    As the northern hemisphere heads towards its second winter battling covid-19, epidemiologist Professor Dame Anne Johnson explains the risk of a surge in flu cases and how to avoid a double pandemic. Also, a decline in mental health was one of the unforeseen consequences of the coronavirus crisis. Dr Wendy Suzuki, a neuroscientist, advises how to turn everyday anxiety into a positive emotion. And, a new form of sea defence is part natural, part artificial. Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Running to stand still: Canada’s election

    21/09/2021 Duración: 20min

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau remains in power after Monday’s election, but he emerges without the majority he wanted, and with his soft power damaged. He now faces a fourth wave of the pandemic and an emboldened far-right from a weaker position. Child labour fell markedly in the 16 years after the turn of the millennium. Now it’s on the rise again. Efforts to prevent children from working can often exacerbate the problem. And we consider one of the more unusual ideas for combating climate change: potty-training cows.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • To a Lesser Degree: Trailer

    20/09/2021 Duración: 01min

    Rising global temperatures have already increased the frequency of floods, wildfires, droughts, and heatwaves around the world. If humanity does not change course rapidly, the effects of climate change will become more extreme.What can be done to avoid this outcome?Vijay Vaitheeswaran, the Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, will be joined weekly by expert guests to explore how everything—from finance to agriculture, transport to international policy—will have to change to take the world’s temperature down ‘To a Lesser Degree’.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Potemkin polls: Russia’s elections

    20/09/2021 Duración: 21min

    The winner of Russia’s elections was not in doubt. Vladimir Putin’s party, United Russia, came out on top. But despite the ballot stuffing and repression, the opposition still managed to rattle the Kremlin. The Gates Foundation is America’s biggest charitable foundation by far and a powerhouse in the world of public health. But its money could be better spent. And we read the tea leaves to explain why bugs are important for your brew. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: September 20th 2021

    20/09/2021 Duración: 24min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the dream and danger of decentralised finance, how America is substantially reducing child poverty (10:02) and a defence of, like, “like” (18:57) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Life choices

    17/09/2021 Duración: 40min

    When the Supreme Court declined to block a Texas law prohibiting most abortions after six weeks, it gave the strongest signal yet that its conservative majority is prepared to deny women the right to an abortion. Nearly fifty years after Roe v Wade, might that landmark ruling soon be overturned? Legal historian Mary Ziegler assesses Roe’s chances of survival. We look back to when the abortion debate turned deadly. And pro-life activist Kyleen Wright tells us why liberals are wrong to accuse her movement of hypocrisy. John Prideaux hosts with Mian Ridge and Jon Fasman.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sub plot: the AUKUS alliance

    17/09/2021 Duración: 22min

    The alliance between America, Britain and Australia has enormous significance, most of all for its nuclear-submarine provisions. We look at the global realignment it represents. The container-shipping industry has had a wild year and its prices reflect the vast disarray; we ask whether things will, or should, get back to normal. And the growing trend of politicians’ media-production companies.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Scott Gottlieb

    16/09/2021 Duración: 30min

    As President Biden pushes to get more Americans fully jabbed, Anne McElvoy asks the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration whether America’s vaccine mandates will work. The author of “Uncontrolled Spread” discusses the failures in handling the covid-19 pandemic and the efficacy of booster shots. And, what is the best temperature to cook a steak?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Shake, rattle the roles: Britain’s cabinet reshuffle

    16/09/2021 Duración: 21min

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson has re-allocated a number of key government posts. We ask how the changes reflect his political standing and what they mean for his agenda. A first-of-its-kind study that deliberately infected participants with the coronavirus is ending; we examine the many answers such research can provide. And the rural places aiming to capitalise on their dark skies.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Alice in DeFi-land

    15/09/2021 Duración: 31min

    After a painstakingly slow start, the financial system is now digitising fast. Alice Fulwood, The Economist’s US finance correspondent, and host Rachana Shanbhogue explore the different emerging models shaping the future of money and payments. With David Marcus, head of Facebook Financial and Novi, its new digital wallet system; Benoît Cœuré, head of innovation at the Bank for International Settlements, a club of central banks (recorded at the 2021 Eurofi forum) and Lex Sokolin, head of decentralised finance at ConsenSys, a blockchain software firm.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hunger gains: Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis

    15/09/2021 Duración: 20min

    Economic collapse and halting international aid following the Taliban’s takeover have compounded shortages that were already deepening; we examine the unfolding disaster. The verdict in a blockbuster case against Apple might look like a win for the tech giant; a closer read reveals new battle lines. And the data that reveal how polluters behave when regulators are not watching.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Booster shot

    14/09/2021 Duración: 24min

    As the northern hemisphere heads towards its second pandemic winter, some countries have already started to make third doses of vaccine available to their most vulnerable citizens. But scientists disagree about whether offering boosters is the best use of vaccine resources—or necessary at all. And, a big study in Bangladesh finds simple ways to encourage mask use. Also, we reveal our book competition winner. Kenneth Cukier hosts.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.Terms and conditions for the book competition featured in this podcast are available at economist.com/podcast-contest.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Percent of the governed: California’s recall vote

    14/09/2021 Duración: 23min

    Governor Gavin Newsom is fighting off a bid to remove him that puts the world’s fifth-largest economy and, possibly, control of the Senate in play for Republicans. Russia’s exercises in Belarus are the largest in 40 years—showcasing a chummy relationship and worrisome military might. And how Dante Alighieri’s masterwork “The Divine Comedy” still holds lessons, 700 years after his death.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Getting their vax up: America’s vaccine mandates

    13/09/2021 Duración: 20min

    President Joe Biden’s requirements for employers to insist on vaccinations are a bold move amid flatlining inoculation rates. But will they work? For decades the world’s cities seemed invincible, but the pandemic has hastened and hardened a shift in urban demographics and economics. And an ancient Finnish burial site scrambles notions of gender roles in the distant past.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: September 13th 2021

    12/09/2021 Duración: 23min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America then and now: the bitter legacy of 9/11. Why nations that fail women fail, (9:42) and a forgotten revolution in pottery (17:58) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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