The Economist Radio (All audio)

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Sinopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodios

  • Drum Tower: Autocrats' pact

    31/01/2023 Duración: 35min

    It’s been a year since Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin announced the “no-limits” friendship between China and Russia. What drives the relationship and which side benefits from it more?In the first episode of a two-part series, The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, assess how the relationship between Mr Xi and Mr Putin has evolved over the past year and ask whether the friendship has any boundaries.They also speak to Wang Yiwei, director of the Institute of International Affairs at Renmin University, about how China sees Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and whether that view has changed over the course of this year.Sign up to our weekly newsletter here and for full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Not shy about retiring: strikes in France

    31/01/2023 Duración: 20min

    Fixing the complex, creaking pension system remains central to President Emmanuel Macron’s agenda of reforms. But leaving it alone is central to French identity—so workers are striking, again, in huge numbers. Our correspondent lays out why 2023’s first earnings season is so gloomy. And America is providing more legal protections for polyamorous “throuples”.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Editor’s Picks: January 30th 2023

    30/01/2023 Duración: 26min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the humbling of Goldman Sachs, a crisis of confidence in Egypt (9:20) and how to conduct a sex survey in Britain (19:05).Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Didn’t protect or serve: Tyre Nichols’s killing

    30/01/2023 Duración: 27min

    The response to the death of the 29-year-old has differed from that of previous cases of police killings; we ask what the tragedy indicates about how America deals with police violence. Our correspondent says a lawmaker’s murder in Afghanistan highlights the misery of women under the Taliban. And why a decades-old model of animal and human learning is under fire. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Checks and Balance: Hunting ground

    27/01/2023 Duración: 44min

    House Republicans hope that by delving into Hunter Biden’s business dealings they’ll find a trail of wrongdoing leading back to the president. Is this just the usual partisan mudslinging? Or will the Hunter Biden saga spell trouble for Joe Biden?Andrew Rice from New York magazine tells us what is on Hunter Biden’s laptop. The Economist’s James Bennet remembers the time a president’s brother caused trouble. And Republican congresswoman Anna Paulina Luna explains why she wants to investigate the Biden family.  John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. You can read the New York magazine piece we mention, by Andrew Rice and Olivia Nuzzi, hereYou can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Tunnel, no lights: South Africa’s crumbling infrastructure

    27/01/2023 Duración: 23min

    South Africa’s infrastructure—its ports, railways and power grid—are struggling and poorly managed. Ordinary South Africans are increasingly fed up. We profile Russia’s new military commander in Ukraine. And our obituaries editor remembers one of Britain’s finest rural writers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Money Talks: Can Disney rekindle the magic?

    26/01/2023 Duración: 41min

    The Walt Disney Company turns 100 years old this week. But the silver screen success that helped it become the world’s biggest entertainment company will not be enough to keep it on top for another century. As households swap cable packages for streaming, and kids turn to gaming, rather than movies, Disney needs reanimating.On this week’s podcast, hosts Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird ask whether Disney has lost its touch. The Economist’s Tom Wainwright takes us on a tour of the Magic Kingdom, to assess its sprawling empire. Analyst Rich Greenfield explains why the company is losing billions on streaming. And Matthew Ball, former head of strategy for Amazon Studios, tells us about the big bet Disney needs to make if it wants to retain its crown.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Bibi’s gambit: Israel’s government v its judiciary

    26/01/2023 Duración: 26min

    Israel’s right-wing coalition government has the country’s supreme court in its sights. Their proposal to effectively subjugate its independence to the legislature has sparked protests and stirred concern for the country’s democracy. Our correspondent reports from a newly reopened Shanghai. And how gas stoves became the latest battleground in America’s endless culture wars.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Babbage: The private Moon race

    25/01/2023 Duración: 41min

    Three firms are racing to become the first private company to land on the Moon. The potential commercial opportunities range from mining lunar resources to establishing a human base with communications infrastructure. But the commercialisation of the Moon raises tricky questions about who owns Earth’s closest neighbour.Steve Altemus, CEO of Intuitive Machines, explains what he hopes his company’s missions will achieve, while Ian Jones of Goonhilly Earth Station describes how the blossoming private space sector is boosting the economy. And Dhara Patel, an expert at Britain’s National Space Centre, explores how the international community has attempted to govern space. Alok Jha hosts with Tom Standage, The Economist’s deputy editor.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Tanks, a lot: arming Ukraine

    25/01/2023 Duración: 24min

    After months of foot-dragging, Germany is sending tanks to Ukraine, with America poised to follow suit. We examine how that could reshape the battlefield. Why Sudan’s democratic transition has stalled and its economy is struggling. And we reveal the secret to perfectly cooked chips.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Drum Tower: Slow train home

    24/01/2023 Duración: 41min

    China is celebrating the lunar new year. The Ministry of Transport predicts that by February 15th over 2bn journeys will be made by Chinese heading to their home towns–and for some migrant workers, it'll be the first time they've returned since the start of the covid-19 pandemic three years ago. The Economist's Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, has a standing ticket for a train ride that’s part of the biggest annual human migration on the planet. He asks passengers on a two-day train from Guangzhou to Urumqi about the economic and emotional challenges involved in going home. He and Alice Su, our senior China correspondent, also hear from Han Dongfang, founder of the China Labour Bulletin, about a pay problem that's gripping the country's most vulnerable workers.Sign up to our weekly newsletter here and for full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Marshalling resources: rebuilding Ukraine

    24/01/2023 Duración: 26min

    Around one-fifth of Ukraine’s population has fled. The country’s GDP has plummeted and foreign investors are staying away. Even as the fighting rages, the world has already begun thinking about how to rebuild the country. How a 36-year-old treaty helped heal the ozone layer. And why the pandemic did not lead to a wave of job-killing automation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • The World Ahead 2023: The art of forecasting

    23/01/2023 Duración: 23min

    We turn the spotlight on forecasting itself, and look back on the predictions we made for 2022. How accurate were we? How do “superforecasters” look into the future? And how can forecasters account for irrational world leaders when predicting major events? Charlotte Howard, The Economist’s executive editor, talks to Tom Standage, editor of The World Ahead, and Warren Hatch, the CEO of Good Judgement, a “superforecasting” platform and partner of The Economist.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Feeling un-Wellington

    23/01/2023 Duración: 26min

    Jacinda Ardern resigned as New Zealand’s prime minister last week. As Chris Hipkins prepares to take over, we reflect on Ms Ardern’s legacy, and look at the challenges her successor inherits. What the world’s plethora of grandparents means for families. And which issues currently motivate America’s far-right.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Editor’s Picks: January 23rd 2023

    23/01/2023 Duración: 28min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Disney’s second century, Turkey’s looming dictatorship (10:25) and how young people spend their money (17:35). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Checks and Balance: Incoming alerts

    20/01/2023 Duración: 39min

    Reports of the slow death of American incomes have been exaggerated.  Since the turn of the millennium, hourly earnings have grown steadily in real terms.  While those at the top have taken most of the gains, in the past few years, the poorest have done well too.  Where does that leave those in the middle?  What’s behind the two decades of growing incomes?  And why hasn’t a richer population brought a more contented politics?The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch explains the latest data on incomes–and why it can be tricky to calculate.  We go back to another time where economic perceptions and reality were far apart.  And Betsey Stevenson, of the University of Michigan, discusses what all this means for income inequality.John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe

  • A rarefied air: a dispatch from Davos

    20/01/2023 Duración: 27min

    The global elite’s annual Alpine jamboree may have lost some of its convening power, our editor-in-chief says, but the many encounters it enables still have enormous value. Our correspondent considers what the closing of Noma, a legendary Danish restaurant, means for the world of fine dining. And remembering Adolfo Kaminsky, whose expertly forged documents saved thousands of Jews’ lives. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Money Talks: How globalisation gave way

    19/01/2023 Duración: 41min

    America has changed the way it views the rest of the world. Rather than pushing for a more globalised economy with fewer trade barriers, the US is now seeking a more protected system of international trade. President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act promises nearly $400bn to boost clean energy and reduce dependence on China for things like batteries for electric cars. The Chips Act, meanwhile, provides incentives worth $52bn to boost America’s semiconductor industry.On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood examine what this new zero-sum era means for the global economy. Chad Bown from the Peterson Institute for International Economics tells them the age of globalisation isn’t returning any time soon. Henry Gao from Singapore Management University blames America’s attempt to “out-China China by becoming more like China”.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and a

  • Turkey stuffed? A democracy’s last stand

    19/01/2023 Duración: 23min

    President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has dismantled the country’s institutions. As an election looms we ask what democratic guardrails remain, and examine the wider risks if those go, too. “Non-compete” clauses designed to protect trade secrets when employees depart are being abused—and trustbusters are going after them. And Ryuichi Sakamoto, a famed Japanese composer, reckons with mortality in his latest release.Music from “12” courtesy of Milan Records.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Babbage: How to detect a deepfake

    18/01/2023 Duración: 41min

    Digital fakery, from the latest generation of deepfakes to lower-tech trickery, threatens to erode trust in societies and can prevent justice from being served. But how can technology be used to both detect deepfakes and authenticate real images?Patrick Traynor, a professor at the University of Florida, explains a novel method to expose audio generated by artificial intelligence. Ilke Demir of Intel Labs demonstrates how to spot visual fakery by analysing colour changes in the face. Plus, The Economist’s Benjamin Sutherland investigates the flipside of deepfakes: how to prove that footage is real. And Wendy Betts of eyeWitness to Atrocities explains how her technology is being used as evidence for war crimes. Alok Jha hosts.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

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