Sinopsis

Select the specific PBS NewsHour updates, in-depth reports, interviews and analysis that match your interests. (Updated daily)

Episodios

  • With Georgia in dead heat, Trump and Biden woo Black voters

    With Georgia in dead heat, Trump and Biden woo Black voters

    27/09/2020 Duración: 03min

    Polls show that Georgia, which President Trump won by nearly five points in 2016, has emerged as a hotly contested state with Biden and Trump battling it out for the Black vote. Meanwhile, officials are recruiting thousands of tech savvy poll workers and launched a service for voters in the state to track their absentee ballots. Senior Correspondent for Georgia Public Broadcasting, Rickey Bevington joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Presidential debates make headlines, but do they win votes?

    Presidential debates make headlines, but do they win votes?

    27/09/2020 Duración: 05min

    On Tuesday, President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden will face-off in the first presidential debate, which is being billed as a potential "game changer." Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield looks at the history of presidential debates and tells us why evidence suggests that the impact of these widely watched events may be overstated. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Inside Georgias latest attempt to change how people access Obamacare

    Inside Georgia's latest attempt to change how people access Obamacare

    27/09/2020 Duración: 07min

    In Georgia, a new health insurance proposal could upend the Affordable Care Act exchange. While proponents see the changes as a way to increase health insurance enrollment, critics warn that tens of thousands of Georgians could lose healthcare coverage. NewsHour Weekend's Christopher Booker reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Puerto Rico gears up to vote in statehood referendum this Nov

    Puerto Rico gears up to vote in statehood referendum this Nov

    27/09/2020 Duración: 06min

    In the last four years, Puerto Rico's billion dollar debt crisis, devastation caused by hurricanes, earthquakes, and the mass exodus of half a million to the mainland, have all thrown the territory's relationship to the U.S. in the national spotlight. This November, Puerto Ricans will vote in the statehood referendum of 2020, which asks a question that has been at the heart of Puerto Rican politics for decades: Should the territory be admitted to the union as a state? Ivette Feliciano reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • In rural Massachusetts, racial injustice persists despite big BLM turnout

    In rural Massachusetts, racial injustice persists despite big BLM turnout

    26/09/2020 Duración: 07min

    This summer, thousands of residents showed up for the Black Lives Matter protests in Great Barrington, Massachusetts -- a small town of less than 7,000 people. NewsHour Weekend's Zachary Green, who grew up there, reports on how Black people in the progressive town are still facing racial discrimination. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Will Gulf Coast hurricane season impact this years vote?

    Will Gulf Coast hurricane season impact this year's vote?

    26/09/2020 Duración: 04min

    Climate justice organization 350.0rg is hosting an online forum on Wednesday called "Stronger than Storms," where leaders from U.S. communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis will share their experiences. One organization participating in the forum is the Gulf Coast Center for Law and Policy based out of Sidell, Louisiana. NewsHour Weekend's Ivette Feliciano spoke with the center's founder, climate activist and Obama Foundation Fellow, Colette Pichon Battle, about civic engagement in the face of hurricane season. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Louisiana Dems are trying to redefine the party in the deep red state

    Louisiana Dems are trying to redefine the party in the deep red state

    26/09/2020 Duración: 06min

    Our ongoing series "Roads to Election 2020" looks at the deep red state of Louisiana where the Democratic party has elected a new leader with the hope of energizing its base and bringing back voters who left the party as it struggled with its identity in the state. Louisiana Public Broadcasting's Natasha Williams joins Hari Sreenivasan for more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Lawmakers pay respects to Ginsburg, 1st woman to lie in state in U.S. Capitol

    Lawmakers pay respects to Ginsburg, 1st woman to lie in state in U.S. Capitol

    25/09/2020 Duración: 03min

    The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg broke two barriers Friday, becoming the first woman and the first Jewish American to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol. Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt, the wife of a former Ginsburg law clerk, eulogized her as changing "the course of American law." House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Joe and Jill Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris also attended. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Breonna Taylors family demands grand jury transcripts

    News Wrap: Breonna Taylor's family demands grand jury transcripts

    25/09/2020 Duración: 05min

    In our news wrap Friday, Breonna Taylor's family demanded Louisville officials release transcripts from grand jury proceedings over whether to charge police in her death. Kentucky's attorney general said officers had acted in self-defense, after Taylor's boyfriend fired first. Also, the U.S. federal government has executed a Black inmate for the first time in nearly 20 years. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Trump moves to open Tongass National Forest for logging, to environmentalists dismay

    Trump moves to open Tongass National Forest for logging, to environmentalists' dismay

    25/09/2020 Duración: 06min

    During his first term, President Trump has rolled back or weakened more than 100 environmental regulations. On Friday, his administration moved to open up the country's largest national forest for development. Alaska's Tongass National Forest has been called "America's Amazon," and it absorbs about 8 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. Amna Nawaz talks to The New York Times' Coral Davenport. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Amb. Khalilzad on peace negotiations and reducing violence in Afghanistan

    Amb. Khalilzad on peace negotiations and reducing violence in Afghanistan

    25/09/2020 Duración: 07min

    The government of Afghanistan and the Taliban are in the early stages of negotiations representing the most significant attempt yet to deliver peace. Zalmay Khalilzad, the U.S. special envoy for Afghan reconciliation, signed an agreement with the Taliban in February that led to the talks. But violence between the government and the Taliban remains high. Khalilzad joins Nick Schifrin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Why the presidential election result could take days or weeks -- and become chaotic

    Why the presidential election result could take days or weeks -- and become chaotic

    25/09/2020 Duración: 09min

    This year's presidential election faces unprecedented challenges, between the pandemic and President Trump's efforts to sow doubt about the integrity of voting by mail -- and whether he would accept an election loss. Is American democracy positioned to handle the threat? William Brangham talks to Barton Gellman, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for The Atlantic, which recently covered the story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Shields and Brooks on Ginsburgs legacy, Trumps election rhetoric

    Shields and Brooks on Ginsburg's legacy, Trump's election rhetoric

    25/09/2020 Duración: 14min

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the legacy of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the battle over filling her Supreme Court seat, President Trump's continuing rhetoric about the integrity of voting by mail and concerns over election confusion or dissent. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Remembering victims of COVID-19

    Remembering victims of COVID-19

    25/09/2020 Duración: 03min

    The NewsHour has been honoring victims of the coronavirus pandemic for six months. With the number of American lives lost now over 200,000, we share the stories of five more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • This Kentucky singer-songwriter seeks to bridge the urban-rural divide

    This Kentucky singer-songwriter seeks to bridge the urban-rural divide

    25/09/2020 Duración: 06min

    As the election approaches, the country feels culturally and politically divided. Some of the starkest differences are between rural and urban areas. Now, a singer-songwriter from Western Kentucky is hoping her music can help Americans to find some common ground. Jeffrey Brown reports as part of our American Creators series and our ongoing arts and culture coverage, Canvas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Ruth Bader Ginsburgs legacy -- and the Supreme Courts future

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg's legacy -- and the Supreme Court's future

    25/09/2020 Duración: 56min

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of women's rights and the Supreme Court's second female justice, died Sept. 18 at her home. Her work on sex discrimination cases early in her career helped accelerate gender equality in the U.S. Ginsburg was seen as a bastion for liberal values on the high court, where she authored a number of memorable opinions -- and became an unlikely pop culture icon. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Trump prompts controversy with refusal to accept a potential election defeat

    Trump prompts controversy with refusal to accept a potential election defeat

    24/09/2020 Duración: 03min

    The U.S. presidential race is preoccupied Thursday with a stunning question: might President Trump refuse to abide by the results of an election he loses? So far, Trump has declined to confirm he would accept defeat, prompting widespread criticism and disbelief. But Republican lawmakers are insisting that if Trump loses, a peaceful transition of power will occur. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: At Senate hearing, Mnuchin touts fastest economic recovery

    News Wrap: At Senate hearing, Mnuchin touts 'fastest economic recovery'

    24/09/2020 Duración: 05min

    In our news wrap Thursday, Democrats at a Senate hearing pressed the Trump administration to negotiate a new pandemic relief package. But Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the country is already "in the midst of the fastest economic recovery from any crisis in U.S. history." Also, the president's niece, Mary Trump, accused him and his siblings of cheating her out of millions of dollars. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • National outrage after decision not to charge officers for Breonna Taylors death

    National outrage after decision not to charge officers for Breonna Taylor's death

    24/09/2020 Duración: 02min

    Officials in Louisville, Kentucky, are appealing for calm after public outrage over the decision not to charge police with Breonna Taylor's death. Two officers were shot and wounded amid new protests in the city overnight. But grief and anguish about the result of the case, in which Taylor was fatally shot in her apartment as she slept, extend across the nation. Yamiche Alcindor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Trump says voting by mail isnt reliable. What does the evidence show?

    Trump says voting by mail isn't reliable. What does the evidence show?

    24/09/2020 Duración: 07min

    President Trump's refusal to commit to a peaceful transition of power is tied to his criticism and false statements about voting by mail, which is expected to reach record levels in this election. Trump insists it can't be trusted -- but many state and local election officials disagree. Miles O'Brien reports on how voting by mail works -- and what past experience indicates about its reliability. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

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